Masterplanet Concept Revealed by Architect Bjarke Ingels
to redesign Earth and stop Climate Change

Bjarke Ingels and his team wrote the guidebook for combating climate change known as the Master-Planet. One of the largest deterrents to climate-centric architecture has been scalability. Ingels believes that focusing solely on individual structures can be very limiting. Instead, a more dynamic and accumulative plan to action with global cooperation can prove that a sustainable human presence on planet Earth is attainable with existing technologies.

Founder of BIG, Bjarke Ingels and his team have come together to write a guidebook for combating climate change known as the Master-Planet. The approach divides environmental problems into ten sections. Ingels encourages a unified and planet-centric approach at a time of divisiveness and indecisiveness. One of the largest deterrents to climate-centric architecture has been scalability. Ingels believes that focusing solely on individual structures can be very limiting. Instead, a more dynamic and accumulative plan to action with global cooperation can prove that a sustainable human presence on planet Earth is attainable with existing technologies.


Masterplanet divides the world’s environmental problems into 10 sections in a hierarchy. The first five cover the needful amenities and greenhouse gas-emitting sectors- transport, energy, food, industry, and waste management. And five cover other areas on which humans need to address to live sustainably on earth—biodiversity, water, pollution, health, and architecture and urbanism, to link up these sectors and dividing the squares can increase the consistency of every segment successfully. The practical barriers to the solutions proposed on Masterplanet by BjarkeIngels are very contemporary. Nearly impossible but achievable, he also gave an insight into how political regimes can work together to handle the scale of this master unit. With a worldwide pandemic of COVID-19, the world has seen the change in every working sector and its direct effects on the habitats of the place. This encounters the BIG plan, adding another challenge to follow the safety measures titled by WHO.


Ingles had devised the master plan for the Penang Island, Malaysia, designed a resilient series of artificial islands, to which he has been adhered to use sustainable techniques effectively in the upcoming scope of the project. His ideology of working with synergies has been rudimentary and captivating to the mass. Ingels describes the role of architecture in changing the society as making it fit for our needs and desires: “When something doesn’t fit anymore, we architects have the ability – and responsibility – to make sure that our cities do not force us to adapt to outdated leftovers from the past, but fit to the way we want to live”.

RTF – Rethink the Future
Photo Credit to : Dezeen.com